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I am so angry right now. It looks like Beorn and I won’t be able to vote in the election because of what amounts to voter registration fraud.

In September soon after we moved to “Crunchy Town” we ran into some people registering voters at the local farmers market. This was our first chance to register, so we jumped on it. And handed our completed forms over to the volunteers to turn in.

Well now we have discovered, well after the deadline is past, that they never turned in our registrations.

Considering the stink that the MacCain camp made over Obama’s links to Acorn I feel very upset. I had a roommate working for Acorn in Chicago when I was in college and they work to empower people stuck in terrible situations, educate people and help them get themselves out of poverty.
If they did over-register people I have to believe that it was unintentional on the part of the organization. If they were paying people per registration then some unscrupulous person/people registered false names. But that wouldn’t lead to false votes, unless someone was going to the effort to vote under those false names. Since the motivation to register false names was money per registration, not per vote, that seems unlikely.

On the other hand, the people that took our registrations and threw them in the trash were intentionally throwing out our votes. I’m angry because I was looking forward to voting in this historic election. I wanted to tell my grandchildren, if I ever manage to have children, that I voted for the first black president of the US.

Look at how nicely WordPress imported all my old posts! It even managed to get the photos which has never worked for me before. The header photo I’m using under creative commons license. It was taken by Pix Elate.

Edit: WordPress.com is stripping all javascript from the blog. How annoying is that? So it will take a while to recreate my blog roll.

Does anyone else out there ever get tired of talking about gender? I’m experiencing feminist fatigue, it’s sort of like chronic fatigue, only caused by having to explain basic concepts of how to treat women like people to someone over and over again.

Right now I have an especially bad case because our roommate, lets call him Viking Boy, is strangely obsessed with gender, as if women were some sort of strange aliens. He will regularly say things like “This is man food!” or “I don’t want any of that girlie salad!” with little or no irony. So I feel the need to try to explain to him that everyday activities like eating or (last night) pumpkin carving are not particularly gendered.

I attended a pumpkin carving party last night and carved a very scary bat into my pumpkin. 

Then again, I feel obligated to point out to other men that gender might be affecting how people interact with them. For example, the professor and two other TAs I’m working with this quarter are all men. I get 6-12 people showing up for my office hour each week and they get 1-2. Now there might be other factors involved like the fact that I chose a time the middle of a Thursday afternoon or that I have emphasized repeatedly to my students that they should ask for help. But considering that I get some of their students too and that another grad student (also a woman) has been helping another female student from the class with her homework, I think there is a good chance that gender might be influencing who students ask for help.

So now I’m wondering if there might be a link between men who can’t seem to notice when the dishes need doing and men who can’t seem to notice how gender influences their lives?

Would it help if they read Finally, A Feminism 101 Blog?

Your result for The Classic Dames Test…

Katharine Hepburn

You scored 14% grit, 33% wit, 62% flair, and 7% class!

Anyone else want to take the quiz?

Here’s my basic question – Under what conditions would you (as a grad student) consider applying for welfare programs like low income housing or foodstamps?

Here’s my situation. One of the main reasons that I decided to switch programs and go to Crunchy U. is that they offer the option to buy health insurance for your spouse and dependents. Ever since last summer when we were living in an attic filled with black mold Beorn has been developing unexplained health problems. He is always exhausted and his blood test show that he is anemic. He also has constant joint pain and a high “rheumatoid factor.” We are having more tests done. Needless to say, having continuing health coverage for him is essential.

He feels fairly bad on a day to day basis and so may have trouble working full time unless we figure out what is wrong. In the mean-time, we are living on my stipend and student loans. Last night we discussed applying for disability for him and investigating the possibility of food stamps. I’m having some difficulty with this because if I dropped out of school with my master’s degree I would likely be able to find a job that pays more than my TA stipend, so it seems somehow wrong to apply for assistance. On the other hand, I have no way of knowing what kind of work I might find or whether my new job would offer health insurance for Beorn. Most likely it would be difficult for me to support us on one salary and pay off my monumental student loans.

If I stay in school I know I have a job for the next three years at least and health insurance. Given the unstable state of the economy at the moment taking risks doesn’t seem wise. Mainly, I want to stay in academia. I love my new department and love the privilege of teaching and researching topics that interest me. If I was to quit school I know I wouldn’t find a job I love that would pay me what I need to be paid, at least not right away.

I know many people would never consider applying for welfare while in school, but apparently there is a long tradition of graduate students on welfare, judging by this thread on College Confidential. But here are a couple of vignettes from my week to fuel your thinking about why someone might consider it.

While riding the bus home this week I overheard a conversation between a couple of undergrads. They were discussing the stock market crash. One young guy was telling the other how bad it had gotten for his family. His dad had told him that he might have to get a part time job because his stocks had been so devalued. I sat there shocked that his dad wouldn’t require him to a least work a few hours a week for spending money.

Later in the week I ran into one another woman in my cohort – a woman of “non-traditional student” age who had returned to school to earn a masters degree. She told me a little about her background — how she started living on her own a week after her highschool graduation. She had dropped out of school because her parents hadn’t been willing or able to help her pay for college. This attitude is common in working class families and yet there is no way for students under the age of 25 to prove that they aren’t getting help from their families. So she dropped out of college and went to beauty school. She joked that she should have just got married or “knocked-up” because then at least she wouldn’t be counted as her parents’ dependent. After a number of years supporting herself doing manicure and pedicures she decided that she was really tired of massaging strangers’ feet. Since she was now 26 she could qualify for financial aid as an independent. She went back to school, got her B.A. and a job she really enjoyed. Now she’s supporting herself working as a research assistant in a lab while she gets her M.A.

I also know a number of international students who are in a financial pickle because their spouses don’t have work visas. Back in 1998 in the Chronicle, David North from the Department of the Interior urged universities and graduate students to admit that grad students are the working poor.

It is interesting to compare two populations being supported by Uncle Sam: Buck privates in the Army and graduate students working as research assistants on federal grants. While the compensation packages for both groups are complex, unmarried first-year privates receive an average of $17,000 a year, and married ones about $1,000 more.

In comparison, the median stipend for the 41 unmarried graduate students whom I interviewed (in 1996-1997) was $14,000. Universities do not grant larger stipends for students with families; in fact, the median stipend for the 46 married students I interviewed was actually smaller — only about $12,000.

Most graduate students have to live on their stipends; a few have help from their families or from a working spouse. Many, particularly U.S. citizens, go into debt.

He goes on to advocate that universities should counsel graduate students to use public assistance that they qualify for:

As a policy matter, I believe that universities should pay their graduate assistants at least as much as privates in the military earn — a step that federal agencies could encourage by slight increases in their formulas for calculating research grants.

Failing that, graduate schools should accept the fact that their Ph.D. candidates are members of the working poor and help those students figure out how to use federal assistance programs. Perhaps graduate students in social work could be hired part-time to help the Ph.D. candidates apply for those programs. Why should the working poor among our graduate students continue to lose out on benefits that they are legally eligible to receive?

The issue of graduate students taking public aid has also been extensively debated on MetaFilter. More recently, an article on the US News site reports that the number of college students receiving food stamps in Florida is up 44% when compared to last year. Considering the current state of the economy, I wouldn’t be surprised to see this trend continue. Given the number of low income and working class students that drop out of college should we really begrudge these students some extra help?